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. >>> let me finish with a behind the scenes look at what really happened at the great kennedy/nixon debates. you will love these stories i have dug up. this is "hardball," the place for politics. and cheese add up to 100 calories? your world. ♪ [ whispers ] real bacon... creamy cheese... 100 calories... [ chef ] ma'am [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. [ male announcer ] how do you make 70,000 trades a second... ♪ reach one customer at a time? ♪ or help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared information... ♪ into a fifth anniversary of remission? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. >>> roun brown's in the national journal wrote the main reason oen is doing better in battleground zats has to do with his increase from white working women. keep in mind, back in 2008 nationally obama only got 41% of that group's vote. well, today in michigan 46% say they support the president. in florida it's 48%. nevada, new hampshire, wisconsin, and pennsylvania, hovers around 50%. in ohio and iowa, it's up to 52%. lo
richard m. nixon and the democratic candidate senator john f. kennedy >> reporter: they began just 52 years ago on september 26, 1960. >> i think mr. nixon is an effective leader of his party. i hope he would grant me the same >> schieffer: some people who listened to it on the radio thought that nixon won but it was generally conceded that people who watched it on television were pretty convinced that jack kennedy won >> absolutely. what you say is important. but what you look like can be also as important >> mr. nixon, would you like to comment on that statement >> i have no comment and in nixon's case, he percent spired. he had the audacity to per spire. as a consequence, the venue where you are where a debate goes on, it's like a meat locker. that's the reason. they negotiate how cold it's going to be because nobody wants to per spire because look what happened to nixon. it's amazing. >> schieffer: even a great communicator like franklin roosevelt knew the risk of debating. he was a heavy favorite to win re-election in 1940, so when republican wendell wilke demanded a debate, f.d.
between nixon and kennedy. >> that was a very -- >> the actual camera. >> love actually you come in to cbs news here in new york and we have art facts every where. they are all over this new set. >> it's a museum out there. >> i was thinking about it. that debate was an interesting one. it was like did you watch it or did you hear it? if you watched it -- >> had a very different perception. >> very different. >> shows how the candidates handle pressure. is this the way i want to see the demeanor of my leader and it's credited with putting kennedy to the white house that debate because nixon had a lead at the time. >> nixon would argue he had a lead all along. that's another story. he would say the election -- that's another story. three debates, of course, first one. a lot of people think this is the most important one. we'll talk about the big debate moments over the last elections. stick with us. you're watching cbs "this morning saturday" and we'll be back with a look at the debates and how you win and how you lose on the big night. >> i got some ideas on,000 win. >> really? >> i don't
1972. the raging unpopular war in vietnam consumed the bitter campaign battle between president nixon and george mcgovern. suddenly on october 26th, 12 days before the election, vietnam negotiator henry kissinger made a surprise declaration believed to cement nixon's front-runner status. >> we believe that peace is at hand. >> reporter: it was the first so-called october surprise. a late in the game campaign event with a significant impact on the election. >> in order to win re-election for nixon in 1972, he needed to end the vietnam war. and this was sort of the definetive statement. >> reporter: the most famous october surprise was in 1980. 52 u.s. hostages held in iran were not released before the election despite president carter's efforts. instead they were freed as soon as rsh was inaugurated setting off democratic suspicion never proven that reagan elm sears back chanld with iran in delaying freeing the hostages and denied the troubled carter campaign a huge pre-election boost. >> it fed into the whole dynamic of the 1980 race in that jimmy carter was a stumbling ineffective pr
rate by election day. in 1968, humphry was down 15 points to nixon. nixon won and it was by less than 1%. in 19786, there was a 34-point lead over ford. after three debates ford cut the lead to five points and led in the final gallup poll though narrowly lost. in 1980, jimmy carter had consistent advantage in the polls overarmed reagan but the final debate changed everything. polls showing a lead over romney in the key battleground states, democratic pollster who worked for jimmy carter said finding the right example can be tricky. >> we know from the exit polls and others that republicans tend to respond to the polls less than often times. from the news organizations. less than do democrats. >> in 1988, george bush managed a huge swing. dukakis was leading after the democratic convention but lost to bush. in 1992, the incumbent president was down nine points and died with bill clinton but october though clinton eventually won. former pollster questioning the assumption made in today's polls. >> these polls are assuming that you have the same high level of african-american, latino an yo
tuned in to watch senator john kerry -- kennedy, excuse me and vice president richard nixon face off in thestl vafted presidentipre-- televised presidential debate. you know the story. the tanned john f. kennedy and then richard nixon. >>> as w rorted thekeye ate batones today. both mitt romney and president obama in that crucial battleground state. here's romney moments ago ins we terville, ohio, where he wrapped up an event with golfing legend jack nicklaus. >> after the debates and the campaigns and all the ads are overepl in ohio are going to say loud and clear on november 6th, we can't do four more years. we must do better. good morning, all. >> good morning, chuck. >> let's start where where things stand in ohio. we have a whole bunch of polls. saw new york times, quinnipiac polls. they show giant leads, eye-popping if you wi. the esidt teoi u , points up in florida, 12 in pennsylvania. i don't know why they have pennsylvania. i think we've all moved it off e battleground. susan page, cat leads but we can't debate who's leading. >> in ohio it seems clear that this is a state t
do. >>> the candidates need no introduction. the republican candidate vice president richard m. nixon and the democratic candidate senator john f. kennedy. >> i think mr. nixon is an effective leader of his party. i would hope he would grant me the same. the question before us is, which point of view and which party do we want to lead the united states? >> mr. nixon, would you like to comment on that statement? >> i have no comment. >> the sweat pooling onyxen's chin while kennedy is over there cold chillin'. was the presidential race decided right there because of heavy perspiration on the vice presidential mug? can you see who won the first televised presidential debate with the sound off or is that an oversimplification of a slew of factor sfls do campaigns matter or does the man with the best platform for that moment in history actually win? our next guest studied the last six decades of campaignsin exploring thorg. how campaigns do and do not matter. christopher, how are you? >> great. >> i'm of the school that campaigns do matter. that you have to present your ideas and present
power on a certain level. i mean, look, nixon, reagan, george w. bush, republican presidents have learned how to get stuff done at times in the face of congress and sometimes controlled by the other party. you know, this whole notion of the imperial presidency that arose under nixon, not coincidentally, a republican, i think you said it was kind of a tori sense built. but it's really a concentration of power. >> are they stronger than the democrats and they know what that is? assembly, parliamentary? >> in some ways they have been more skillful and more ruthless in the way that they have moved the levers of power. in washington and outside of washington, to get stuff done. >> joy, i don't think the republicans have a karl rove a. malignant sense of power, i'm going to be the architect and i'm going to rule and they are spreading the money around and trying to get back the power. it does seem almost obsessive, the love of the white house. >> i think eugene robinson is right. for conservatives, the idea of being the cowboy, they like the self-image for themselves and want that image
in vietnam consumed the bitter campaign battle between president nixon and george mcgovern. suddenly on october 26th, 12 days before the election, vietnam negotiator henry kissinger made a surprise declaration, believed to cement nixon's front-runner status. >> we believe that peace is at hand. >> reporter: it was the first so-called october surprise, a late in the game campaign event with a significant impact on the election. >> in order to win re-election for nixon in 1972, they needed to end the vietnam war, and this was sort of the definitive statement. >> reporter: the most famous october surprise was in 1980, and the surprise was what did not happen. 52 u.s. hostages held in iran were not released before the election, despite president carter's efforts. instead, they were freed as soon as ronald reagan was inaugurated, setting off democratic suspicion never proven that reagan emissaries back channeled with iran to delay freeing the hostages and deny the troubled carter campaign a huge pre-election boost. >> it fed into the whole dynamic of the 1980 race in the sense that jimmy
up the gaps he has now. >> jack kennedy once said about dick nixon, i feel sorry for the guy because he doesn't know which dick nixon to be on any particular day. he wants the support of the tea party crowd. he needs them, john and mark, but he would never be a tea party person. he wouldn't show up at a yahoo kind of politics we don't like government. he's not been a life long foreign policy hawk, but he wants the support of the neocon community out there. he wants people who are hawkish. he's not a member of the religious right. he doesn't run around liberty university or hang around with jerry falwell, but he wants their support. he's not really a ryan republican ideologue conviction politician, but he put him on the ticket. isn't that the fundamental problem with the guy? he wants to date these people through the election. he wants their support, but he doesn't want to be one of them. he doesn't want to marry them. is that true? >> yes. look, chris, i think he's a person who is fundamentally ill suited to being the republican nominee given what the republican party currently is. a
count above all. jfk, tan. nixon, just out of the hospital, pale, refusing professional makeup. reagan's people fussed more over his than mondale's did over his. reagan always had a glass of wine just before going on to get those rosy cheeks. lesson four, real debating? so far, after 52 years, not actually required here. so relax. learn your lines. don't sneak in a look at your wristwatch. because that will definitely hurt you. beside, 90 minutes and you are done. possibly for good. john donvan, abc news, washington. >> possibly for good. nice line there. >> that's how rob gets his cheeks nice and takes it from the old gipper. it works. i think there's so much choreography that goes behind the debates. iasciwhat made-for-tv evehey first started with nixon and kennedy. >>> this morning on "world news now" -- getting ready for the duel in denver. >> we'll see how both candidates are preparing for the first presidential debate coming up tomorrow night. it is tuesday, october 2nd. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >>> good morning, everybody. i'm rob nelson. >> good to
presidential campaigns since 1968. and humphrey and nixon. so i've been watching debates throughout the years, and it's my super bowl. i mean, i get all excited. i'm so thrilled that the debate is tomorrow, i can hardly wait. so i have observed many of the debates, not just based on my experience, but there is always something, people, after i did the debate, would come and tell me that they were concerned about things that the candidates did. >> like what? >> not what they said. >> like looking at a watch? >> like george bush looking at his watch, and standing near his stool the entire debate. and bill clinton wading right up to the audience questioners showing his compassion and feeling for these people. and it jumped through the screen. and i've had people -- i've had people, you know, these days, telling me, i want to see how they do. it is not -- i want it hear what they have to say about how to solve the economy. they want to see how they do. and i think a lot of things -- the conventional wisdom is that all the debates do is reinforce your ideas about a candidate that you support, or d
, if this issue really gets traction that it deserves, and let it say it deserves, go back. richard nixon was forced out of office because he lied. and because he covered some stuff up. i will be blunt and tell you this. nobody died in watergate. we have people who are dead because of this. there are questions to be answered and americans ought to demand to get answers. and it doesn't matter what the policies are. bill: you're 30 days out from here, under 40 days. how does libya factor in the national discussion? >> the bigger issue is not just what happened in libya. that is huge. the fact that an ambassador was assassinated is huge. the bigger issue, why didn't this white house, why did not this administration all of its various surrogates tell us the truth? they knew the truth. they just didn't tell it. and they have covered it up. in the same way they didn't tell us the truth about the fort hood shooter and didn't tell us the truth about the shooter in little rock who killed a soldier standing outside of a recruiting station. there is much to be held, they should be held accountable f
for him. which lead to lesson three. appearances count above all. jfk, tan. nixon just out of the hospital, pale. refusing proquestional make -- refusing professional makeup. reagan's people fussed more over his than mondale's did over his. reagan always had a glass of wean just before going on to get rosie cheeks. lesson four, real debate sowing -- lesson four, real debating, so far after 52 years, not actually required here. so relax. learn your lines. don't sneak in a look at your wristwatch. because that will definitely hurt you. beside, 90 minutes and you are done. possibly for good. john donvan, abc news, washington. >> possibly for good. nice line there. >> that's how rob gets his cheeks nice and rosie. takes it from the old gipper. >> nice, glass of wine, relaxes you, gives you the blush. it works. i think there is so much choreography that goes behind the debates. it really is fascinating what a made-for-tv event they have become since 1960 when they first started nixon/kennedy. >> i imagine you would be a great debater. >> go ahead and say it. >> no. >> a joke you, know you want
? >> frank nixon, jae schaeffer, all my friends in oklahoma and texas and my beautiful wife quinn. >> drew: how about a tie. right now it's tied, you guys would have a spinoff if she would beat you, or you can spin one more time and try to beat it. >> i think i'll spin. >> drew: dp you're going to spin, oh man. you're not a bird in had the hand guy, you want the two in the bush. 55 and 25? oh! earl, sorry, buddy. michelle, come on over here, just won yourself a new car. go ahead. want to say hi to somebody? >> my mom, my dad, all my family,... >> drew: you're on your way to the showcase! michelle is on her way to >> george: to order tickets online to "the price is right," simply go to cbs.com. under "shows" and "daytime," select "the price is right." click on "tickets" at the top of the page. showcase with a 90. if you want tickets to the show, you want to join the party party here, go to priceisright.com.ñr we have more show coming up. [ female announcer ] do you want strong, beautiful hair? introducing a new brand clear scalp & hair beauty therapy. like good soil is to a tree so is a we
america's meant to be. >> and there, there's nixon with the flop sweat. george h.w. bush looking at his watch. appearances count, don't they? >> they really do. and a professional knows that. george h.w. bush in that debate, that third one in richmond in 1992, he was looking at his watch because he was trying to make the point that one of the other candidates had run over time. it didn't really compute this was sending the message that he was impatient, just the kind of message he didn't want to send. >> humor can be an effective tool, diffuse a weakness. >> i will not make age an issue of this campaign. i am not going to exploit for political purposes my opponent's youth and inexperience. >> and at that moment, a lot of people said well, there's the ball game. including his opponent. >> including walter mondale. >> what do you think about humor as a tool in this debate tonight? >> you'd better be a very accomplished actor like reagan or else it probably won't work. in that case, reagan said certain things that might have given rise to further worry he was too old to serve a second term
to have you here. >> good morning. >> martha: let's start with the classic, which is the nixon-kennedy debate. and folks who watched it on television clearly thought jack kennedy was the winner, but that wasn't necessarily the response of people who didn't get to see it. >> yeah. there was actually four debates. it was the first presidential debate series. people that listened to it on the radio, which was the majority of radios, thought nixon won on substance. people who watched, thought kennedy did. kennedy was tanned and had make-up on. nixon did not. he came out of the hospital a few days earlier. he was gone. it showed. he sweat a lot and the impression people left with was he was shifty can kennedy was in command. >> martha: he refused make-up apparently, which is probably a candidate made that mistake. let's look at carter-reagan, a fascinating one to watch. we have a little bit of sound from it. we want to get your thoughts on that. let's play that. >> governor reagan, as a matter of fact, gone his political career campaigning around this nation against medicare. >> the
f. kennedy and richard nixon squared off in the very first televised debate. while nixon was known for being a fierce debater on camera he looked nervous, sweating profusely under the hot camera lights, whereas kennedy looked calm, cool, collected. forces those that watched the debate, kennedy was the winner, but for those who listened to the debate on radio, they thought nixon won. in the end it was kennedy who won the presidential race. well, of course, humor can also have an affect on the debates. 1908 ronald reagan repeatedly attacked by president jimmy carter for his stance on health care, but reagan won fans with his response. check it out. >> governor reagan, again, typically is against such a proposal. >> governor, there you go again. >> all right. want to bring in presidential historian douglas brinkley. good to see you, as always. let's just start by seeing that moment. how significant was that between carter and reagan? >> oh, it was big. if you go back to 1980, you have jimmy carter, the sitting president, but he had double digit inflation, long gasoline lines, and iran
. >> i play a lot of golf. >> nixon plays golf. >> i don't want to whine and complain, if i was romney in the first ten minutes, i would have -- bam. >> they get you here right here. >> is he a good dancer? >> he's gotten to be a better dancer. >> you really put your foot down. >> stop it. this is hard. you want to try it? get in the ring. >> oh my? was i a little strong? >> when you go after my man -- >> everyone is giving me high fives. >> do you think this would be going better if he had nominated someone else? >> and what's burning down here? >> if you don't man up you got to shut up. >> this is a guy that cares for the 100%. >> we use fairly right now so people don't get tired of her. >> let's get right to our panel now. we're joined by goldie taylor managing editor of the goldie taylor project, jimy williams and julian epstein. julian, if i might begin with you. we saw ann romney last night on with jay leno. she wondered if she had come off a little strong last week when she chastised all of us when we didn't realize how lucky we are for having her husba
with political edge but maybe not. a couple of jimmy carters, richard nixon and others. the candidates are likely to be remembered. president obama, if you need a new jingle, i know where you ca
with political edge but maybe not. a couple of jimmy carters, richard nixon and others. the candidates are likely to
of golf. >> nixon plays golf. >> i don't want to whine and complain, if i was romney in the first ten minutes, i would have -- bam. >> they get you here, right here. >> is he a good dancer? >> he'sotten to be a better ncer. sitlly tourt this is hard. you want to try it? get in the ring. >> oh, my? was i a little strong? >> when you go aer my man -- >> everyone is giving me high fives. >>o you think this would be going betterf he had ninated somee el ahaur down here? >> if you don't man up, you got to shut up. >> this is a guy that cares for the 100%. >> we use fairly right now so people don't get tired of her. >> let's get right to our panel now. we're joined by goldie taylor, managing editor of the goldie taylor project, jimy williams and julian epstein. julian, i might begin with you. we saw ann romney last night on with jay leno. li sg st week when cof she chastised all of us when we didn't realize how lucky we are for having her husband run for president. what did you think of the more humble mrs. romney? >> i don't critique -- >> stop it. t heng get in the wring. >> she does ha
september leads can evaporate by election day. hubert humphrey was down 15 points to richard nixon. nixon won by less than 1%. jimmy carter had a lead over gerald ford. after three debates ford cut the lead to five points and led in the final gallup poll and narrowly lost. the final presidential debate changed everything leading to a regan landslide. >> with polls now showing president obama building a lead over mitt romney in key battleground states a democratic pollster and consultant who worked for jimmy carter says finding the right sample to survey can be tricky. >> we know from the exit polls and others is that republicans tend to respond to the polls less than often times particularly from news organizations less than do democrats. >> reporter: in 1988, george bush managed a huge swing. gallup had michael dukakis leading by 17 points after the convention. the loss to bush by 7%. a former are clinton pollster is questioning the assumptions being made in today's polls. >> these polls are assuming that you have the same high level of african american, latino and young people vote in 2
. the raging unpopular war in vietnam consumed the bitter campaign battle between president nixon and george mcgovern. suddenly october 26th, 12 days before the election, vietnam negotiator henry kissinger made a surprise statement >> we believe peace is at hand. >> the first so-called october surprise, late in the game campaign event with a significant impact on the election. >> in order to win re-election for nixon in 1972, they needed to end the vietnam war. this was sort of the definitive statement. >> the most famous october surprise was in 1980 and the surprise was what did not happen. 52 u.s. hostages held in iran were not released before the election in spite of president carter's efforts. instead, they were freed as soon as ronald reagan was inaugurated, delayed freeing the hostages. >> it fed into the whole dynamic of the 1980 race in the sense that jimmy carter was a stumbling, ineffective president. >> reporter: fast forward to 1992. president george h.w. bush was already on the ropes against bill clinton over a sluggish economy. when casper weinberger was implicated in the iran-con
of nixon's supporters in 1960 were so impressed with this young jack kennedy that they said he didn't sweat. seems pretty cool. seems ok and lot of people had problems with george bush but against john kerry they thought he seems arrogant and frankenstein, i will go to george bush. they can change your established based too and if the other guy does such a great job it could also galvanize his base at the expense of the other guy's base. all stuff we don't know and won't know until election. [talking over each other] neil: bring weapons and kevin thought i should keep that to myself. or something. another ball and chain kind of thing. the next that idea. [talking over each other] dagen: i won't even let you do that. connell: stay here all day if you one. tomorrow night -- dagen: put you to sleep. connell: i am used to it. goes in one year. [talking over each other] connell: special coverage starts at 8:00 eastern tomorrow night. [talking over each other] connell: department of defense telling lockheed martin not to be concerned about the fiscal cliff at the end of the year. rich edson at th
. this is nixon's secret plan for years later. if they think they can cut tax rates and close these loopholes and expenditures, they have to name them. you have to be honest with the american people. they are being totally dishonest. somehow, they think that people will buy it. dagen: dishonest is a big word. mitt romney has alluded towards meeting to let congress -- this will be a comprehensive tax reform. >> if you do not tell the american people it darkly where you will get all of this revenue so you can get a tax break to everybody, and you are not preparing the way, not getting a mandate so once you are collected you can actually do something. will they get rid of the health deduction looks like yes or no. will they wipe out the retirement deductions? yes or no. they will not name a single name and i think it is a vindication of how far the republican party has gotten lost. we cannot afford any tax cuts. we have to deal with our deficit. that will mean spending cuts for everybody. dagen: is it a mistake to run on this at all? how can you focus been on, because the issue is growth and job
with nixon it was about how he sweated. with george bush it was about looking at his watch. it's about someone's eye contact with the camera. but what this really still has to come down to is reminding voters what we're facing. and if we continue to import oil, and fund opec and send our soldiers to defend opec oil fields and lose our blood and treasure there, that's a concern. if we talk about the problems with china and the manipulating their currency and that affecting our manufacturing, that's a concern. it's about the cost of health care rising, about government's role in health care, those are concerns. and whoever looks nice in these things or talks nice doesn't matter so much as what the substance and the takeaway is. because the next morning people are still going to be concerned around their kitchen table, what affects american families. are their kids going to have a future? do they have jobs? is their economy growing -- >> i get that. but also, as you know, the whole point of televised debate, there is a measure of how did you look? how did you seem? did you seem presidenti
political era for getting people like joe mccarthy and richard nixon. talk about the media establishment's view of eisenhower. >> the media establishment basically loved eisenhower. he was their friend. you read his private correspondence. he and the publisher of "time" were great buddies. a lot of time people working in the white house -- it was such a different age. it was not as adversarial. it was much more trusting. correspondents would come out over to the white house, have a few drinks a s with ike. he'd say stuff off the record. he even talked about recognizing china. imagine if that had leaked during the 1950s. it was just a different era. and ike was trustworthy. reporters also trusted him. >> also talk about ike the republican president that was willing to send troops to little rock. >> you know, he gets a lot of grief on civil rights. and it's true he did not use the bully pulpit. he could have done a better job on that. but he was a subtle guy. he desegregated d.c. when people weren't watching. he desegregated the armed services. it wasn't truman. he appointed all the federa
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)

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